Acknowledgement of Traditional Territory

Mary C. Moore Public Library acknowledges that we work as visitors on land within Treaty 6, 1876, and the traditional territory of the Tsuu T'ina and Blackfoot communities (Kainai, Siksika, Piikani) -- communities now found in Treaty 7 of Southern Alberta. 

"It is First Nations protocol to acknowledge the traditional territories upon which one visits or seeks relationship with. To acknowledge Indigenous traditional territory is to recognize that ‘Canada’ has a long history dating back before european colonization and refers to the fact that First Nations have lived and occupied these lands since time immemorial. Today the practice of acknowledging Indigenous territories is growing with more non-Native people becoming aware that Indigenous history has been denied long enough. Practically all of the major cities (and towns) in Canada were built upon long established Indigenous settlements already identified as plentiful and managed for sustainable resource development and trade routes. While colonization worked to erase and re-name Indigenous histories, we see a movement taking place across ‘Kanata’* and Turtle Island to unpack and acknowledge the roots of Canada – 'Our home ON Native land.'" *Canada is derived from the Huron-Iroquois word “kanata”, which means 'village.'" (source: Muskrat Magazine)

 

 

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